The Benevolent Dictator

El Bandolero is alarmed by the surge of sentiment for democracy and majority rule, particularly since the 2016 election. Certain groups, liberals especially, are finding it easy to forget why the country was founded as a republic and why it was deemed necessary to supplement the Constitution with a Bill of Rights. Protection of the “little guy” and “minorities” was deemed essential. Majority rule can be the worst kind of tyranny, and is fertile ground for the worst kind of tyrants. Making matters worse, liberals and conservatives both persist under the thumb of the oligarchy, whose power doesn’t depend on the form of government. The oligarchs hold the strings that manipulate government either way.

Bandolero believes the best hope for humanity is rule by a benevolent dictator. This is always countered by the “absolute power corrupts absolutely” platitude. It ain’t necessarily so, but it’s an easy sell to the masses. The principal weakness of the benevolent dictator is his/her vulnerability to assassins sent by the oligarchy.

The problem with dismantling the oligarchy is how to do it while preserving the incentive to excel. Who wants to build a better mousetrap just for the pride and joy of accomplishment, without material reward and elevation of status? Of course, if human nature could be elevated to being satisfied with pride of accomplishment for its own sake, it wouldn’t need much in the way of governance in any form. In that case, we’d just need an efficient (and benevolent) bureaucracy to manage the infrastructure and provision for education and health care. The oligarchy’s tentacles would have to be cut out of that, too. But, to get from where we are to a benevolent dictatorship with an efficient bureaucracy probably will require the dictator who arises from anarchy. We’re beyond the days when a viable revolution could be prosecuted to a successful conclusion. The people who understand why it’s needed are now too old to mount and sustain such a struggle. The younger ones are too complacent in their “me” lifestyles and the opiate of technology. As long as they have broadband they are content enough. But, reducing the existing institutions to a state of anarchy may yet be possible. And El Bandolero stands vigilant and ready to lead the charge, if anybody cares.

There is, of course, much more to the challenges facing us (that is, those of us who perceive them for what they really are), but that will be discussed in future missives.